Sun. Oct 20th, 2019

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NCAA Clearinghouse

Eligibility Center

http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future

What is the NCAA Clearinghouse? The NCAA Clearinghouse is an essential step in becoming eligible to play college sports. Over 180,000 potential college athletes register with the NCAA every year. If you want to play NCAA college sports and receive a scholarship at the DI or DII level, you will need to register and be cleared by the NCAA. The Eligibility Center is the organization within the NCAA that determines the academic eligibility and amateur status for all NCAA DI and DII athletes.

The First Step in Registering for the NCAA Eligibility Center is to Create Your Account:

How do I register with the NCAA Clearinghouse?

All athletes will eventually create an account. It is best to create your account by the start of your junior year in high school to avoid getting caught it the backlog of athletes trying to get cleared at the end of the year. Once you account is created you will have several more steps to submit your transcripts, test scores and answer you amateur status questionnaire before you are finished. Once You Have Created Your Account Check Your Email and Log in to Finish the Registration Process NCAA Eligibility Center Mailing Address NCAA Eligibility Center P.O. Box 7136 Indianapolis, IN 46207 *please note, you cannot send transcripts or test scores on your own. They need to be sent by your high school and testing center.

  • Core Courses NCAA schools require college-bound student-athletes to build a foundation of high school courses to prepare them for the academic expectations in college. Find your high school’s list of NCAA core courses Learn more about Division I academic requirements Learn more about Division II academic requirements What are core courses? Not all high school classes count as NCAA core courses. Only classes in English, math (Algebra 1 or higher), natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy may be approved as NCAA core courses. Remedial classes and classes completed through credit-by-exam are not considered NCAA core courses. Classes that are NCAA core courses include:
  • •English: English 1-4, American Literature, creative writing
  • •Math: Algebra 1-3, Geometry, statistics
  • •Natural of physical science: biology, chemistry, physics
  • •Social science: American History, civics, government
  • •Additional: comparative religion, Spanish 1-4 Classes that are not NCAA core courses include:
  • •Classes in non-core areas, fine arts or vocations such as driver education, typing, art, music, physical education or welding.
  • •Personal skill classes such as personal finance or consumer education.
  • •Classes taught below grade level, at a slower pace or with less rigor or depth. These classes are often titled basic, essential, fundamental or foundational.
  • •Classes that are not academic in nature such as film appreciation, video editing or greenhouse management. If you take a high school class such as Algebra 1 or Spanish 1 before you start ninth grade, the class may count for your 16 core courses if it is on your high school’s list of approved core courses and is shown on your high school transcript with a grade and a credit.
  • Credit You can earn credit for a core course only once. If you take a course that repeats the content of another core course, you earn credit for only one of these courses and the higher grade counts toward your core-course GPA. Generally, you receive the same number of credits from the NCAA for a core course that you receive from your high school for the class.
  • One academic semester of a class counts for .5 of a core course credit.
  • One academic trimester of a class counts for .34 of a core-course credit.
  • One academic quarter of a class counts for .25 of a core-course credit.
  • A one-year class taken over a longer period of time is considered one core course and is not awarded more than one credit.

Recruiting

The NCAA supports student-athlete well-being by promoting a fair recruiting environment that limits intrusions into the lives of student-athletes and their families.

Recruiting happens when a college employee or representative invites a high school student-athlete to play sports for their college. Recruiting can occur in many ways, such as face-to-face contact, phone calls or text messaging, through mailed or emailed material or through social media.

View a list of 2018-19 recruiting calendars for individual sports.

View a list of recruiting terms and related FAQs

Recruiting terms

contact happens any time a college coach says more than hello during a face-to-face meeting with a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents off the college’s campus.

An evaluation happens when a college coach observes a student-athlete practicing or competing.

verbal commitment happens when a college-bound student-athlete verbally agrees to play sports for a college before he or she signs or is eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent. The commitment is not binding on the student-athlete or the school and can be made at any time.

When a student-athlete officially commits to attend a Division I or II college, he or she signs a National Letter of Intent, agreeing to attend that school for one academic year.

Campus visits

Any visit to a college campus by a college-bound student-athlete or his or her parents paid for by the college is an official visit. Visits paid for by student-athletes or their parents are considered unofficial visits.

During an official visit the college can pay for transportation to and from the college for the student-athlete, lodging and three meals per day for the student-athlete and his or her parents or guardians, as well as reasonable entertainment expenses including three tickets to a home sports event.

The only expenses a college-bound student-athlete may receive from a college during an unofficial visit are three tickets to a home sports event.

National Letter of Intent

A National Letter of Intent is signed by a college-bound student-athlete agreeing to attend a Division I or II college for one academic year. Participating colleges agree to provide financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete as long as the student-athlete is admitted to the school and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. Other forms of financial aid do not guarantee the student-athlete financial aid.

The National Letter of Intent is voluntary and not required for a student-athlete to receive financial aid or participate in sports.

Signing a National Letter of Intent ends the recruiting process because participating schools are prohibited from recruiting student-athletes who have already signed letters with other participating schools.

A student-athlete who signs a National Letter of Intent but decides to attend another college may request a release from his or her contract with the school. If a student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with one school but attends a different school, he or she loses one full year of eligibility and must complete a full academic year at the new school before being eligible to compete.

Learn more about the National Letter of Intent

Division III Celebratory Signing Form

Division III institutions are permitted to use a standard, NCAA provided, non-binding celebratory signing form. A college-bound student-athlete is permitted to sign the celebratory signing form at any point, including high school signing events, after the student-athlete has been accepted to the institution. Institutions should keep in mind, however, that they are not permitted to publicize a student-athlete’s commitment to the institution until the student-athlete has submitted a financial deposit (Bylaw 13.10.7).

To access the Division III celebratory signing form, Division III coaches and administrators can use the “My Apps” link on ncaa.org to navigate to LSDBi. Log in to LSDBi by clicking the “login” tab at the top of the screen and entering your single source sign on information. Once logged in, select the “resources” tab.  Once on the “resources” tab, the celebratory signing form can be found under the “compliance” heading.

Recruiting calendars

NCAA member schools limit recruiting to certain periods during the year. Recruiting calendarspromote the well-being of college-bound student-athletes and ensure fairness among schools by defining certain periods during the year in which recruiting may or may not occur in a particular sport.

During a contact period, a college coach may have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents, watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents.

During an evaluation period, a college coach may watch college-bound student-athletes compete, visit their high schools and write or telephone student-athletes or their parents. However, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents off the college’s campus during an evaluation period.

During a quiet period, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write or telephone college-bound student-athletes or their parents during this time.

During a dead period, a college coach may not have face-to-face contact with college-bound student-athletes or their parents and may not watch student-athletes compete or visit their high schools. Coaches may write and telephone student-athletes or their parents during a dead period.

Educated Athletes